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ryuuenx:

degraalaart:

In case anyone wanted the set!

Also I thought it’d be fun to make a group picture that looks like an ad.

All available as prints here.

(Please don’t delete text)

This is brilliant. Thanks for posting them all together!

(via rosalarian)

DUBS ARE OK

sailorfailures:

You don’t have to like or watch dubs, and indeed it’s valuable to criticise them to ensure their continued improvement, but some of y’all are just… bullies. There are only two valid concerns you can have over a new dub: the skill & accuracy of the writing and the skill & accuracy of the acting. Anything else is just elitism. It’s like some of you just hate dubs on principle. What is this, 2005? Am I in middle school Japanese class wearing a Naruto headband?

We have never been in a better time for good quality dubs, and they’re only improving. Dubbers these days actually start to care about accuracy and quality because they know that’s what the viewers want - they aren’t Westernised and censored beyond recognition any more. I understand how you might think older dubs are terrible but new dubs are totally different. Again - doesn’t mean you have to like them, but the disrespect is unnecessary when most of them are trying to be as faithful and respectful to the original as possible.

Although I prefer subs for a myriad of reasons, I am pro modern dubs because:

  • Dubs are an excellent introduction for people who don’t watch a lot of anime. If you’re trying to show your friend a show you care a lot about, and really think they would enjoy, but they haven’t watched a lot of foreign shows before and are used to watching everything in English, a dub is a great way to get them to test the waters without overwhelming them.
  • Dubs allow you to enjoy and experience your favourite series all over again. Dubs inevitably end up different from the original, and this is not necessarily a bad thing. Small variables add up to give the show a different effect. You’re seeing another incarnation of your favourite show, and why isn’t that great?? You get to see the Sailor Soldiers come to life twice as portrayed by two very talented casts. You can compare the characters within the context of Japan and within the context of the American cultural/social influences that a dub contains. Opposing a dub on principle is like opposing all movies based on books - which also happens, and I still don’t understand why, because…
  • Dubs encourage the growth and success of your favourite series. There are always going to be people who prefer watching dubs to subtitled media, and their preferences aren’t wrong. They might find it easier to differentiate between character voice in English, they might prefer the delivery of lines with English intonations, they might prefer the way the dub cast’s voices sound - whatever, there are a bunch of adequate reasons. People watch anime to have fun, and they should be able to do so in the format they like best. Dubbing anime makes it accessible to these people, and now your favourite show has a totally new area in which to thrive and prosper - which is good. Plus, with modern dubs come prolific voice actors and their fans. Signing up big names like Johnny Yong Bosch, Stephanie Sheh and Todd Haberkorn might attract a crowd of people who are interested in their work (not all of which is dubbed anime) and might not have otherwise been interested in Sailor Moon.
  • vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv
  • SOME PEOPLE CAN’T READ SUBTITLES. I left this point last because it’s the most important and it’s why I get so up in arms about anti-dub hysteria. There’s a myriad of reasons why people are incapable of reading subtitles; they might be very young, they might have limited or no literacy, they might have a vision impairment, they might have difficulty reading - especially quickly - and/or have dyslexia, or they could get terrible headaches trying to read off a computer/TV screen for extended periods. These people exist and when you oppose dubs just because you’re saying that they don’t deserve to enjoy Sailor Moon - or that they have to stick with the old dub, which has all the crappy stuff you’re trying to avoid. With modern dubbing standards, everyone gets the full story and a relatively faithful adaptation.
  • ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I think everyone should give the originals/subs a shot if they can, and I understand that there are rabid dub fans on the other side of the fence who are unreasonable, too (and often racist as hell!). But being anti-dub and anti-dubbing just because is a pointlessly negative practice and I will turn this car around, see if I don’t.

sailorfailures:

reasonstobebeautifulmagazine:

"Something should’ve changed in the planning room that day when our producers and artists decided to make a Sailor Moon anime only about an accurate representation of the manga series. They should have also fixed the show’s misogynistic and racist rhetoric. The Sailor Moon produced now doesn’t stand a chance against us girls who want more for ourselves than to be a ‘pretty princess’"Do you agree?
Read the article HERE 

Your magazine/website seems to be fairly new, so I hope this criticism is useful to you in the future.

"I had the utmost belief that [Sailor Moon Crystal] could regain its strength and find a way out of the stereotypical sexist Japanese drawing aesthetic. I was wrong."

Firstly - not sure what “the Japanese drawing aesthetic” is - your wording is pretty vague. There is no “Japanese drawing aesthetic” just like there’s no “American drawing aesthetic”. If you mean anime, then say anime; but even that would be too vague. There are many different popular archetypes for anime art, and your readers have no way of knowing which “stereotype” you mean.If you mean to imply that Crystal's art style is stereotypical and sexist within its own context (i.e. “modern magical girl anime”), I have to disagree. It is a Western perspective to look at Sailor Moon Crystal and say “Look, a sexist ideal”. Currently speaking, the “sexist stereotype” of contemporary magical girl anime would be the opposite - infantilisation. Magical girl series that are currently created to cater to male audiences tend to make the characters rounder, softer, and more childish-looking. Crystal's angular, mature style is at odds with the popular styles of modern magical girl anime. People have valid concerns about the designs of Crystal, but they were not created to pander to a male magical girl audience.

"A part from being leggier than they were before, they also became alarmingly stick-thin with high-pitched, girly voices."

They have always had high-pitched, “girly” voices. I’m not too sure what your criteria for a “girly” voice is, but these characters are all 14, so I think their voices suit them fine. Sailor Moon, in fact, has the same voice actress as the original, so nothing there has changed.

"The Sailor Moon produced now doesn’t stand a chance against us girls who want more for ourselves than to be a “pretty princess” … In hindsight, the old anime did have minor glimpses of the soldiers offering us a feminist perspective to crush Usagi’s patriarchal dreams."
"Yet, the show still screams stereotypical femininity and a false notion to move forward in perceiving young women’s identity."
"“The princess in my dream was so beautiful. I wish I was a princess too,” says our soon-to-be Sailor Moon. We catch her gazing out the window wishing to quit school to become a full-time pretty princess. We are caught in her gaze as she pictures herself in a white dress, stars gleaming all around her. We are already introduced to a young woman who feels completely useless about herself, failing classes and wishing to ultimately start anew."
"[In order to make Crystal a better show] … let’s not make Usagi’s ultimate dream to get married and have kids"

All of this is just saying “it is wrong for a woman to want to pursue behaviour that has been coded as feminine, and representation of this in media is wrong and upholding the patriarchy”. That’s a ridiculously narrow viewpoint. Your analysis of Usagi’s internal monologue is particularly absurd and reads as very shallow. All that Usagi said is that she wanted to be a princess. She never felt “useless” about herself - that is, in fact, one of Usagi’s strong points, that even when she fails, she bounces back. To say that someone who dreams about how cool being a princess would be must want to “start anew” is very shallow.

"But [Sailor Moon] show begs for interpretation since it’s been in the cultural consciousness of American and anime-loving girls everywhere."
"Give our soldiers and all the individuals in SM different body types and different ethnicities (not just the villians, damnint!)"

You are very clearly judging Sailor Moon Crystal from a western perspective. You have to take a step back (maybe a very long step) and make an effort to understand the context that formed the original Sailor Moon and forms Crystal today, and how it differs to your own background. As it is, it’s very clear that you haven’t challenged any of your preconceptions or your own cultural/social assumptions before applying them to Sailor Moon.

"[To make Crystal better] Give Usagi some agency and confidence besides her magical powers, for once … And stop making her seem like a girlchild”

In a similar vein to “any feminine interests are bad”, this section also sounds like “any negative character traits (excepting Approved Strong Female Character™ Traits) are bad”. Usagi’s weak points not only make her more human, but she works on improving them over the course of the series. Having a character grow and mature out of childish traits offers a stronger message than just having a character who is perfect from the start.I’m not even sure what you mean by “agency” or “confidence” here since, as I understand them, Usagi has both of those in droves. She is motivated and confident and acts on her own accord. This feels like a rather generic and misplaced criticism that I’ve heard applied to almost all female characters at some point. It’s a claim that lacks substance or evidence.

"Bring back our LGBT characters … And our trans characters … Stop the male superiority and the unrealistic gushing over Tuxedo Mask … And the constant need for a man to save her … And give Tuxedo Mask a personality instead of just making him a beefcake."

At this point, I have to ask after the last time you actually watched Sailor Moon? The idea that it encourages “male superiority” in any way is baffling to me. The “constant need for a man to save her” claim is one many Sailor Moon fans have heard before - usually from someone who hasn’t actually watched much of the show. Sailor Moon quickly stops depending on Tuxedo Mask, and his involvement in fights actually tends to become something of a joke. The Sailor Soldiers are the ones who do all the heavy lifting, so to speak. Again - “stop gushing over Tuxedo Mask” fits in a way under “anything feminine is bad”. Usagi (and some others) are actually quite proactive, rather than passive, when it comes to dating. Basically, these criticisms ring hollow and most Sailor Moon fans reading your article would wonder how they actually apply to the series.I should also point out that Sailor Moon Crystal has only had 2 episodes so far. You can’t say “bring back our LGBT characters” when we don’t even know how long the series is going to be yet; where exactly were they supposed to appear?
There were other issues, but those are the major points. All in all, this article felt extremely generic and poorly researched. These are criticisms we’ve heard applied to almost every show with lead female characters before, and most don’t even really seem relevant to Sailor Moon. Ignoring any redeeming qualities from a show and failing to reflect on your own bias/background does not make a strong article.

sailorfailures:

reasonstobebeautifulmagazine:

"Something should’ve changed in the planning room that day when our producers and artists decided to make a Sailor Moon anime only about an accurate representation of the manga series. They should have also fixed the show’s misogynistic and racist rhetoric. The Sailor Moon produced now doesn’t stand a chance against us girls who want more for ourselves than to be a ‘pretty princess’"

Do you agree?

Read the article HERE

Your magazine/website seems to be fairly new, so I hope this criticism is useful to you in the future.

"I had the utmost belief that [Sailor Moon Crystal] could regain its strength and find a way out of the stereotypical sexist Japanese drawing aesthetic. I was wrong."

Firstly - not sure what “the Japanese drawing aesthetic” is - your wording is pretty vague. There is no “Japanese drawing aesthetic” just like there’s no “American drawing aesthetic”. If you mean anime, then say anime; but even that would be too vague. There are many different popular archetypes for anime art, and your readers have no way of knowing which “stereotype” you mean.
If you mean to imply that Crystal's art style is stereotypical and sexist within its own context (i.e. “modern magical girl anime”), I have to disagree. It is a Western perspective to look at Sailor Moon Crystal and say “Look, a sexist ideal”. Currently speaking, the “sexist stereotype” of contemporary magical girl anime would be the opposite - infantilisation. Magical girl series that are currently created to cater to male audiences tend to make the characters rounder, softer, and more childish-looking. Crystal's angular, mature style is at odds with the popular styles of modern magical girl anime. People have valid concerns about the designs of Crystal, but they were not created to pander to a male magical girl audience.

"A part from being leggier than they were before, they also became alarmingly stick-thin with high-pitched, girly voices."

They have always had high-pitched, “girly” voices. I’m not too sure what your criteria for a “girly” voice is, but these characters are all 14, so I think their voices suit them fine. Sailor Moon, in fact, has the same voice actress as the original, so nothing there has changed.

"The Sailor Moon produced now doesn’t stand a chance against us girls who want more for ourselves than to be a “pretty princess” … In hindsight, the old anime did have minor glimpses of the soldiers offering us a feminist perspective to crush Usagi’s patriarchal dreams."

"Yet, the show still screams stereotypical femininity and a false notion to move forward in perceiving young women’s identity."

"“The princess in my dream was so beautiful. I wish I was a princess too,” says our soon-to-be Sailor Moon. We catch her gazing out the window wishing to quit school to become a full-time pretty princess. We are caught in her gaze as she pictures herself in a white dress, stars gleaming all around her. We are already introduced to a young woman who feels completely useless about herself, failing classes and wishing to ultimately start anew."

"[In order to make Crystal a better show] … let’s not make Usagi’s ultimate dream to get married and have kids"

All of this is just saying “it is wrong for a woman to want to pursue behaviour that has been coded as feminine, and representation of this in media is wrong and upholding the patriarchy”. That’s a ridiculously narrow viewpoint. Your analysis of Usagi’s internal monologue is particularly absurd and reads as very shallow. All that Usagi said is that she wanted to be a princess. She never felt “useless” about herself - that is, in fact, one of Usagi’s strong points, that even when she fails, she bounces back. To say that someone who dreams about how cool being a princess would be must want to “start anew” is very shallow.

"But [Sailor Moon] show begs for interpretation since it’s been in the cultural consciousness of American and anime-loving girls everywhere."

"Give our soldiers and all the individuals in SM different body types and different ethnicities (not just the villians, damnint!)"

You are very clearly judging Sailor Moon Crystal from a western perspective. You have to take a step back (maybe a very long step) and make an effort to understand the context that formed the original Sailor Moon and forms Crystal today, and how it differs to your own background. As it is, it’s very clear that you haven’t challenged any of your preconceptions or your own cultural/social assumptions before applying them to Sailor Moon.

"[To make Crystal better] Give Usagi some agency and confidence besides her magical powers, for once … And stop making her seem like a girlchild”

In a similar vein to “any feminine interests are bad”, this section also sounds like “any negative character traits (excepting Approved Strong Female Character™ Traits) are bad”. Usagi’s weak points not only make her more human, but she works on improving them over the course of the series. Having a character grow and mature out of childish traits offers a stronger message than just having a character who is perfect from the start.
I’m not even sure what you mean by “agency” or “confidence” here since, as I understand them, Usagi has both of those in droves. She is motivated and confident and acts on her own accord. This feels like a rather generic and misplaced criticism that I’ve heard applied to almost all female characters at some point. It’s a claim that lacks substance or evidence.

"Bring back our LGBT characters … And our trans characters … Stop the male superiority and the unrealistic gushing over Tuxedo Mask … And the constant need for a man to save her … And give Tuxedo Mask a personality instead of just making him a beefcake."

At this point, I have to ask after the last time you actually watched Sailor Moon? The idea that it encourages “male superiority” in any way is baffling to me. The “constant need for a man to save her” claim is one many Sailor Moon fans have heard before - usually from someone who hasn’t actually watched much of the show. Sailor Moon quickly stops depending on Tuxedo Mask, and his involvement in fights actually tends to become something of a joke. The Sailor Soldiers are the ones who do all the heavy lifting, so to speak. Again - “stop gushing over Tuxedo Mask” fits in a way under “anything feminine is bad”. Usagi (and some others) are actually quite proactive, rather than passive, when it comes to dating. Basically, these criticisms ring hollow and most Sailor Moon fans reading your article would wonder how they actually apply to the series.
I should also point out that Sailor Moon Crystal has only had 2 episodes so far. You can’t say “bring back our LGBT characters” when we don’t even know how long the series is going to be yet; where exactly were they supposed to appear?

There were other issues, but those are the major points. All in all, this article felt extremely generic and poorly researched. These are criticisms we’ve heard applied to almost every show with lead female characters before, and most don’t even really seem relevant to Sailor Moon. Ignoring any redeeming qualities from a show and failing to reflect on your own bias/background does not make a strong article.

(via tanukitsune)

keyofnik:

This moment is huge.

It’s huge and it KNOWS it’s huge, and it’s created specifically be BE huge. I’m happy to say that it works for me so well in so many ways.

We don’t know where Crystal’s going to go yet, but assuming it follows the same basic points from the original anime (which it may or may not), then there WAS no Sailor Moon in the Silver Millennium.

I’ve talked a whole lot about how I see things in the SilMil, very much including the relationship between Princess Serenity and her Senshi. My headcanon (loosely) is the idea of Sailor Moon is a creation of Queen Serenity fulfilling the desires of her daughter (see also here, here, and here). What we are seeing is no less than the birth of Sailor Moon.

I love the moment where Usagi names herself. LOVE. She has a second of hesitation where she tries to answer the very simple question of “Who are you?”, and while Luna prompts Usagi, she doesn’t TELL her. That’s a tiny detail that I simply adore.

In the original anime, Luna tells Usagi who she is.

image

In PGSM, Usagi says it herself, but automatically, as though it’s already old hat.

image

With Crystal we have that moment where Usagi genuinely has NO IDEA how to answer who she is. From the standpoint of my Giant Sailor Moon Canon Voltron (which I’ll apply until Crystal shows me otherwise), she SHOULDN’T. There’s never been a Sailor Moon before now.

It is so wonderful and important that Usagi gets to decide who she’ll be.

I love how, as the moon shines brighter, Usagi seizes this. Throughout Crystal we’ve seen her fumbling around and generally seeming like life is something completely out of her control. She can’t get up on time, she can’t go down stairs properly, she can’t take two steps without busting her face. She’s late, she’s hungry, she’s failing. She’s not up on the latest trends and news, she’s not good at games without help, her family’s upset with her. She can’t even get a nap in.

But in this moment when Usagi is asked who she is, she panics for just a second, but then SHE KNOWS. It’s everything she’s waited two lifetimes to be. A slow smile spreads, and for the first time all episode — possibly for the first time in her life — we see a glimmer of person Usagi has the capacity to be.

I think there are a lot of reads on this, on that smile in particular. But for me, I adore what I see as a moment where — for reasons she couldn’t possibly understand — Usagi feels she’s waited her entire life to say the words “I am Sailor Moon”.

asieybarbie:

having to wait two weeks for a new episode is already ruining me. ffffff

asieybarbie:

having to wait two weeks for a new episode is already ruining me. ffffff

(via asieybarbie)

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1st Edition release with bonus winking face: Bandai Tamashii Nations Sailor Moon S.H. Figuarts Action Figure

New re-release (no-bonus face, but cheaper): Bandai Tamashii Nations Sailor Moon “Sailor Moon” S.H. Figuarts

Hearts face only available with Sailor Uranus figurine: Bandai Tamashii Nations S.H.Figuarts Sailor Uranus 

*56
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Bandai Tamashii Nations S.H.Figuarts Sailor Uranus (comes with bonus Sailor Moon face!)

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